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Thursday, December 14, 2017

To cross one's fingers

Idiom: to cross one's fingers; used as a verb



First Example:

Oscar: I have a job interview later today.     
Tiffany: What's it for?
Oscar: A new startup - it pays better than my current job; plus, it's what I went to school for.
Tiffany: That sound perfect.
Oscar: Yeah. Cross your fingers that it goes well.  
Tiffany: I will!

Meaning: The expression "to cross one's fingers " means to wish for something to happen. In the above example, Oscar says Tiffany to "cross your fingers" that his interview goes well. In American culture, people often physically cross their fingers to non-verbally say "wish me luck;" you can also ask someone to "cross their fingers" or say that you are "crossing your fingers" without physically doing so for the same meaning.



Second Example:

Mom: Why were you up all night?
Son: I was studying. I have a big test today.
Mom: I thought you were playing video games.
Son: No, I'm just nervous about this test.

Mom: I'll be crossing my fingers that you do well!


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Thursday, December 7, 2017

At the drop of a hat


Example:

My friend had an extra Taylor Swift ticket and offered it to me. She's my favorite, so I took the ticket at the drop of a hat. I didn't even hesitate for a second.

Meaning: To do something suddenly or immediately, especially because you're excited about it.

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Tuesday, December 5, 2017

To have an axe to grind


Example:

I have an axe to grind with my friend. I lent him $100, and he said he'd pay me back the next day, but it's already been over two weeks. The next time I see him, I'm not going to be in a good mood when we talk.

Meaning: This expression means that someone in the past treated you poorly, and you have a problem with what the did, and you are angry at them.


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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder


Example 1: Two friends gossiping about their classmate

Camila: Hey, Barbara, have you see Johnny's new girlfriend?? 

Barbara: Oh my goodness, yes. Where did he meet her? 

Camila: I have no idea. I always thought Johnny was pretty good looking, but his girlfriend, uh, not so much....

Barbara: Well, beauty is in the eye of the beholder I guess. Johnny probably sees something we can't see. 


Example 2: Roommates discussing furniture

Jay: This is the amazing couch you were telling me about?! It's kind of ugly, Jeff.

Jeff: What are you talking about?! This print reminds me of when I was a kid. I love it!

Jay: Well, to me, it's super old-fashioned and outdated. 

Jeff: You know what they say, "beauty is in the eye of the beholder," and I love it!


Explanation:

In both examples, one person believes someone/something is ugly. The "beholder" is the person who is looking at the person/object and sees them/it through their eyes/preference/experience. In example 1, Johnny (the beholder) sees beauty in his girlfriend even though others cannot. In example 2, Jeff (the beholder) sees a beautiful couch while Jay thinks it's ugly. Basically, the expression means people can see some beauty when others might not.

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Read between the lines


Example 1:

Will: Mary won’t return my calls.  I’m not sure if she’s sad or sick.
Heather: Did anything happen? 
Will: I told her I liked her as a girlfriend, and she just disappeared.  I’m not sure why she won’t return my phone calls.
Heather: You have to read between the lines Will.  I don’t think she likes you the same way, and she’s trying to show you by staying away.


Example 2:

Mark: I can’t understand what the point of this statement is.  I can understand the words and content, but not the main idea.
Alice: Sometimes you have to read between the lines to understand what someone is trying to tell you.
Mark: What do you mean?
Alice: Well, sometimes things have a hidden meaning or implied meaning.  Look for clues.

Explanation:
  
Read between the lines means to look for a the meaning of something hidden in a statement.

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

To fall for someone


Example 1:

Veronica: I want to tell you something, but please don’t run away.
Charles: Is it pretty bad?  I’m not sure, but okay tell me.
Veronica: I have fallen for you
Charles: Really?  I fell for you too.



Example 2:

Nick: I’m not happy that my sister is dating someone I hate.  It’s just not fair.
Every: What?  Your sister fell for that crazy guy from the concert.  Not good.

Explanation:


To Fall For Someone means to fall in love with a person.  In the first example, both Veronica and Charles liked each other and decided to confess.  In the second example, Nick was upset that his sister made poor choice in men, as his friend Emery described him as “crazy guy.”


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Thursday, November 9, 2017

To Fancy Someone or Something

Idiom: To fancy someone means to be attracted to or like a person; to fancy something means to want something (like an object or product) or to want to do something (like an activity).



Context #1


Millie: Hey, Val. You look happy. What are you thinking about?


Val: Oh, hi Millie. Well, you know that I fancy that new guy in class, right?

Millie: The guy from New York? Bill?

Val: Yes. That guy. Well, he just asked me out a few minutes ago. We are having dinner together on Friday night!

Millie: Great news! He obviously fancies you, too!


Context #2: Two friends are talking about a weekend trip

Candy: I'm so excited about this weekend! I really fancy skiing, especially at Big Bear mountain!


Tarik: I know. It is going to be so fun! Do you have all your skiing gear?

Candy: Yes. Here it is.


Tarik:
 Wow! I really fancy your ski goggles! They are so cool. 


Candy: I just bought them at that new sporting store down the street. They were really cheap and there are many colors to choose from.

Explanation: To fancy someone means to be attracted to or like a person; to fancy something means to want something (like an object or product) or to want to do something (like an activity). In context 1, Val fancies Bill and she is happy because he just asked her out on a date. In context 2, Candy fancies skiing (an activity) and Tarik fancies Candy's ski goggles (thing).


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