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Thursday, April 24, 2014

To be out

Idiom: to be out



Context #1

Jim:  Hey, you'd better wake up Steve.  You know the teacher hates when he sleeps in class.
Tom:  I already tried.  I poked him several times but he still didn't wake up.  He is out!

Context #2

Susie:  What time did you get home from the party last night?
Kathy: I got home around 2 o'clock in the morning. 
Susie: Yeah, me too.  I was so tired I just went to bed.
Kathy: I know.  I brushed my teeth and then turned on the TV to watch a movie but I was out in like 5 minutes.

Meaning: to be out is an American idiom that is used when you describe someone who is in a deep sleep.  When I person is out, it is usually because they are really tired, really exhausted, or really drunk. If someone is out, it is really hard to wake them up. Practical idioms like this are taught in the Speaking and Conversation classes at LSI.  

For more information please visit www.languagesystems.edu

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

To get jipped

Idiom:  to get jipped


Context #1:

Sam: Hey, nice cell phone!
Tom: Yeah, I got it on E-bay for $100.
Sam:  Really?  You got jipped.  I saw the same exact phone at Best Buy for $50.
Tom: Oh man!

Context #2:

Julie: I bought this book on Amazon and the seller said that it was "like new."  But look, there's writing in pen all over the place.
Christine:  It looks like you got jipped.  I would return that book and ask for a refund!
Julie:  Yeah, I'm going to do that.

Meaning:  to get jipped is an idiom in American English that is used for situations where you pay for something but the price is not fair or is unreasonably high.  Sometimes you pay too much for something that is not worth that much.  Sometimes a seller is dishonest and is trying to make a huge profit.  In these situations, you can use this idiom.  Practical idioms like this are taught in the Speaking and Conversation classes at LSI.  

For more information please visit www.languagesystems.edu