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Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Wind down



Example 1:
Mom 1: What time do your kids usually go to bed?
Mom 2: Hmm, around 8:30 or 9 pm the latest.
1: Wow, that's pretty good! How do you get them to bed so early? My kids fight and protest until about 10 pm.
2: Well, we limit screen time which means no phones or TV after 6 pm. A bath helps them wind down, too.
1: Oh that makes sense!  I will have to try those tips. Thank you!

Example 2:
Jake: Are you free on Saturday?
Luis: I might be, but I have a brunch with friends and I'm not sure what time that will end.
Jake: We're going to go see the new super hero movie that night. You should really try to join us. We're buying tickets in advance for the 7 pm showing.
Luis: I really want to see that! Can you get me a ticket? I'm sure the brunch will be winding down by around 3 pm. I should be able to make it.

Explanation:
In Example 1, wind down is used in the same way you would use the word relax.  A bath helps them relax, too.
In Example 2, wind down is used to signal the ending or closing of some event. I'm sure the brunch will be ending by around 3 pm.

Pronunciation: wind is pronounced liked wine, with the long i sound.




Tuesday, January 8, 2019

To rat on/out


to rat on/out: (verb)

Situation #1: Two students and a teacher

Maria: Mr. Andersen? I think Hank is cheating off of my test.         
Hank: What?! No way!
Mr. Andersen: Let me see your test, Hank.                    
Hank: Why? This is so unfair.
Mr. Andersen: Hmm... You do have all of the same answers as Maria - even the wrong ones. I'm sorry Hank, but I'm going to have to give you a zero on this test.
Hank: Why did you rat on me, Maria?
Maria: Because you were cheating.
                           
Explanation: To "rat on" or "rat out" someone means to tell a person in a position of authority that someone did something wrong. In the example above, Hank says that Maria "rats on" him when she tells Mr. Andersen that Hank is cheating off of her test. The expression "rat on/out" comes from the American mob, where a "rat" is someone who tells the police secrets; it is a very negative thing to say about a person. "Rat out" is usually interchangeable from "rat on," as can be seen in the next example.
                                                                                                                             
Situation #2: Two friends

Katie: Did you hear about Christina's party last night?
Daniel: Yeah, I went! It was awesome! But it got a little too crazy. There were a lot of drugs being taken.
Katie: What? Did you take any?
Daniel: No! I just had a couple beers.
Katie: Did you call the police?
Daniel: Why would I do that?
Katie: Because people were taking drugs. That's illegal!
Daniel: Well, yeah, but I'm not a rat. I'm not going to rat out my friends just because they decide to something illegal. Especially if they're not hurting anyone.
Katie: Well, I would have called the police.

Daniel: And that's why you don't get invited to parties.